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Blog Live Chat

I AM: May 10

Maryland Apprenticeship Programs: Earn while you learn!

Jane Sinclair, Apprenticeship Navigator for the Maryland Department of Labor Registered Apprenticeship and Training Program will give a presentation about Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State of Maryland.

The presentation will provide a brief background about how registered apprenticeships work and why Earn while you Learn opportunities through apprenticeship are a great way to start a career. We will also briefly discuss how to research apprenticeship opportunities and how to apply for positions, followed with time for questions.

Registered Apprenticeship in Maryland PDF

Check out the recent article in Forbes by Dr. Judy Stone on this issue!

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Accessible Assistive Technology Resources Advocacy Resources Bridges Blog Educational Resources Employment Resources Independent Living Resources Information Resources Series: Life After IEPs series, May 2021

Changes in Rights to Instructional Services

The second in a four-part series: Life After IEPs Series.

Once high school ends, so do IEPs, this month, the Free Bridges Helpdesk Transition Tip Tuesdays explores post-secondary, IEP-free life. Topics discussed include:

Part 1: When Do Things Change, and Why?

Part 2: Changes in Rights to Instructional Services

Part 3: Changes in Rights to Accessible Equipment

Part 4: Changes in Rights to Accommodations and Modifications

In this second installment of the series, we discover how students’ rights to instructional services change when they are no longer eligible for IEPs.

Rights to instructional services under IEPs

IEPs typically provide a wide range of instructional services for students with disabilities. In addition to the regular instruction all students receive, students with IEPs are entitled to disability-related instructional services, including braille instruction, cane travel instruction, and instruction in using accessible assistive technology.

Rights to post-secondary instructional services under Section 504 and the ADA

Unlike IEPs, the reasonable accommodations required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) must be specifically requested by the disabled individual. Please note that the post-secondary school is permitted to require proof of the disability/disabilities for which the reasonable accommodations request is made. Additionally, it is usually helpful to make the request as early as possible and to engage in a dialogue about what reasonable accommodations one needs.

Post-secondary educational institutions include college, universities, community college, vocational rehabilitation centers, and many more. The vast majority of these institutions are subject to Section 504 and the ADA and may not discriminate against disabled individuals.

Section 504 and the ADA provide civil rights protections, but they do not provide specific educational rights. Thus, blind/low vision students in post-secondary education have a right to reasonable accommodations needed to access the regular education provided, but they do not have the right to receive disability-specific instructional services (unless those are part of the school’s regular curriculum).

What does this mean?

After high school, a disabled individual does not have the right to disability-related instructional services that are not part of the regular curriculum. However, the individual DOES have the right to receive reasonable accommodations to access the regular curriculum. Examples of these reasonable accommodations include braille, enlarged print, accessible electronic materials, accessible science lab equipment, accessible class software, etc. However, it is important to remember that, while both Section 504 and the ADA require the school to provide reasonable accommodations, these laws do NOT require the school to teach you how to use these reasonable accommodations.

Next week, we’ll explore how rights to accessible equipment change under Section 504 and the ADA.

Contact us

Follow the Bridges Helpdesk Facebook page for more transition tips, and please contact the Free Helpdesk for Maryland Blind/Low Vision Transition Students, Families, and Educators anytime using:

This unique project is being coordinated through The IMAGE Center of Maryland, a center for independent living in Towson, and it is funded by a grant from the Maryland Department of Education Division of Special Education/Early Intervention Services.

Categories
Blog Live Chat

I AM: Monday, May 10, 2021

Jane Sinclair, Apprenticeship Navigator for the Maryland Department of Labor Registered Apprenticeship and Training Program, gives a presentation about Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State of Maryland. The presentation provides a brief background about how registered apprenticeships work, and why Earn While You Learn opportunities through apprenticeship are a great way to start a career.

We also briefly discuss how to research apprenticeship opportunities and how to apply for positions, followed with a Q&A.

Recording of the Independence Amplified Maryland event from May 10, 2021.

Don’t forget to visit our registration website to donate to support these events or register for upcoming calls!

Categories
Advocacy Resources Bridges Blog Educational Resources Employment Resources Independent Living Resources Series: Life After IEPs series, May 2021

When Do Things Change, and Why?

The first in a four-part series: Life After IEPs Series.

Once high school ends, so do IEPs, this month, the Free Bridges Helpdesk Transition Tip Tuesdays explores post-secondary, IEP-free life. Topics discussed include:

Part 1: When Do Things Change, and Why?

Part 2: Changes in Rights to Instructional Services

Part 3: Changes in Rights to Accessible Equipment

Part 4: Changes in Rights to Accommodations and Modifications

In this first installment of the series, we examine when and why students are no longer eligible for IEPs.

When do I stop having an IEP?

Most IEPs for blind/low vision students end because the student graduates from high school or “ages out” at age 21, in Maryland.

Why do IEPs stop?

IEPs (individualized education plans) are required by a law known as the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). The IDEA provides educational rights for students with disabilities in public school through high school graduation or age 21, whichever comes first. Thus, high school graduation or “aging out” ends a student’s eligibility for an IEP, even if the disability still exists, and even if the student still has educational needs.

What next?

There are other laws that protect individuals with disabilities, including blind and low vision. These laws, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), protect individuals of all ages, but IEPs often provide similar and additional protections. Once the IEP is no longer in effect, blind/low vision students still have Section 504 and ADA protections.

Next week, we’ll explore how rights to instructional services change under Section 504 and the ADA.

Contact us

Follow the Bridges Helpdesk Facebook page for more transition tips, and please contact the Free Helpdesk for Maryland Blind/Low Vision Transition Students, Families, and Educators anytime using:

This unique project is being coordinated through The IMAGE Center of Maryland, a center for independent living in Towson, and it is funded by a grant from the Maryland Department of Education Division of Special Education/Early Intervention Services.